All posts by yalepodcasts

Noël Valis talks about Lorca After Life



Noël Valis is a professor of Spanish who studies interdisciplinary approaches to modern Spanish culture, including religion, literature, and celebrity. She has received a number of honors and awards, including the Victoria Urbano Academic Achievement Prize in 2017 for her work in Hispanic women’s and gender studies.

Learn more about Noël Valis.


The HAPPINESS Project and Increasing Access to Mental Health Services



The HAPPINESS Project is one of the ways Yale faculty and students are tackling the complex, global challenges of connecting people with mental health services. The HAPPINESS Project aims to improve mental health care delivery in Nigeria, and the methods and technology developed through the project have the potential to help many other communities. Upon their return from Lagos, Nigeria, President Peter Salovey, Dr. Theddeus Iheanacho, Dr. Charles Dike, and Mr. Eddie Mandhry discuss the partnerships Yale is developing through this project and the Yale Africa Initiative.


A Mom Fights for Patient Safety, with Sue Sheridan



After her infant son suffered due to a succession of medical errors, Sue worked tirelessly to prevent this from happening to others, starting by writing letters to the health care regulatory bodies until she and a group of mothers had formed a nonprofit and put out guidelines for the regulatory bodies to follow. In the midst of all of this, Sue’s husband was misdiagnosed as having a benign tumor, when it was later discovered to be a malignant sarcoma. With this she redoubled her efforts to lead us to a safer health system.


Professor Sharon Jacobs on The Statutory Separation of Powers



Professor Sharon Jacobs talks about her recent article, The Statutory Separation of Powers. Separation of powers forms the backbone of our constitutional democracy. But it also operates as an underappreciated structural principle in subconstitutional domains. This Article argues that Congress constructs statutory schemes of separation, checks, and balances through its delegations to administrative agencies. Like its constitutional counterpart, the “statutory separation of powers” seeks to prevent the dominance of factions and ensure policy stability. But separating and balancing statutory authority is a delicate business: the optimal balance is difficult to calibrate ex ante, the balance is unstable, and there are risks that executive agencies might seek expansion of their authority vis-à-vis their independent counterparts. After exploring a case study involving the Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the article concludes with recommendations for how Congress, agencies, and the judiciary might mitigate these tendencies and preserve the statutory separation of powers as a meaningful safeguard against the perils of concentrated executive policy-making authority.


Nyesha Arrington: Born to Create



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Representation in the restaurant industry matters. Afro-Korean chef Nyesha Arrington joins us to reflect on her multicultural experiences growing up in LA, training in Michelin star restaurants, and competing on television and internationally. In navigating different––and sometimes exclusive––cooking spaces, Nyesha has drawn on her own identities and experiences to empower and evolve her craft. Listen to how art, culture, place, community, and love come to define her food, and more importantly, her own self-discovery.

Nyesha Arrington’s visit comes as part of our “Cooking Across the Black Diaspora” series, a themed line-up for Chewing the Fat. In collaboration with the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale, and the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration, the series commemorates Black History Month, and both the Afro-American Cultural Center and Yale Department of African American Studies’ 50th anniversary.

To learn more about Nyesha, follow @nyeshajoyce on Instagram and Twitter. She soon debuts on two TV series, Plate Worthy (Eater), and The Kitchen (Food Network).

about us:

website: https://www.sustainablefood.yale.edu/chewing-the-fat-podcast

facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram

twitter: @ysfp

instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Eric Greene talks about Chan Before Chan: Meditation, Repentance, and Visionary Experience in Chinese Buddhism



Professor Greene specializes in the history of medieval Chinese Buddhism. Much of his recent research has focused on Buddhist meditation practices, including the history of the transmission on Indian meditation practices to China, the development of distinctly Chinese forms of Buddhist meditation, and Buddhist rituals of confession and atonement. In addition to these topics, he has published articles on the early history of Zen Buddhism, Buddhist paintings from the Silk Roads, and the influence of modern psychological terminology on the Western interpretation of Buddhism.

Learn more about Eric Greene.


How to think theologically about money



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Emily Judd interviews Yale Divinity School alum and former Democratic nominee for Massachusetts governor Bob Massie, in a conversation that covers Christianity’s teachings on money and wealth, his health battles with hemophilia and HIV, and what inspired him to leave ministry and go into politics.


From Unpaid Employee to U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence with Christopher Mellon



Christopher Mellon recounts his career path from unpaid employee to U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence. The Yale alum also discusses his current work on the History Channel show Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation and his conviction that life exists beyond earth.


Ep. 28 – Bathsheba Demuth on Capitalism, Communism and Arctic Ecology



In her acclaimed first book, “Floating Coast,” historian Bathsheba Demuth explores how capitalism, communism and ecology have clashed for over 150 years in the remote region of Beringia, the Arctic lands and waters stretching between Russia and Canada. Demuth trekked through the landscape and historical archives in search of answers to questions such as: How did whales become known through the labor of their killing? What happened when human ideas of “progress” were subject to the pressures of arctic life? Why did the superpowers’ grand attempts to cultivate a reindeer farming industry fail? In this episode, we speak with Demuth about these questions and about how creatures like bowheads whales were understood, imagined, and treated vastly differently by three distinct groups of hunters over the past two centuries — indigenous Yupik and Inupiaq whalers, capitalist whalers, and communist whalers — and the fundamental role animals themselves played in how its history unfolded.


Ranu Roychoudhuri talks about her project, Photographs of People, Monument for a City



Ranu Roychoudhuri talks about her project, Photographs of People, Monument for a City.

Professor Roychoudhuri is a visiting scholar in the South Asian Studies Council. She comes to Yale from the Indian Institute of Technology, where she is assistant professor of humanities and social sciences. She is a historian of photography and art with interests in South Asian studies, postcolonial theory, popular visual culture, and the intellectual history of art.

Learn more about Ranu Roychoudhuri.