All posts by yalepodcasts

Bryant Terry: Vegetable Kingdom



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Plant-based. Vegetable-forward. These terms have become more and more popular in a culinary world now obsessed with sustainable eating. But what if these ideas are hardly new? What if they have deep cultural roots around the world that often go underacknowledged or underappreciated?

Bryant Terry is the chef-in-residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. His newest cookbook, Vegetable Kingdom, is a beautiful homage to Black and Afro culinary traditions that emphasize plant-based cooking. Music, also finds itself front and center in this book. Each recipe features a song to cook to, and the entire playlist can be found here.

At a time where physical distancing means we’re often staying indoors, this conversation is sure to offer something special for all of us. Bryant shares more in this collaborative episode with the Table Underground’s Tagan Engel, detailing the ways in which his cookbook and work advocate for a more just, resilient food system.

Bryant’s visit to campus came as part of our “Cooking Across the Black Diaspora” series, a themed line-up for Chewing the Fat. The series commemorates Black History Month, and the 50th anniversary for both the Afro-American Cultural Center and Yale Department of African American Studies. Chief co-sponsors include the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale, and the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration, with Saybrook College, LoveFed New Haven, People Get Ready! Books, and the Table Underground also supporting Bryant’s visit.

about us:

website: https://www.sustainablefood.yale.edu/chewing-the-fat-podcast

facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram

twitter: @ysfp

instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


How to find joy in a time of suffering



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Emily Judd interviews Yale Divinity School professor Mary Clark Moschella about how to find one’s life purpose, focus on the positive despite obstacles, and her Yale course that brings together graduate students and incarcerated women.


Supporting & Enriching Child Care in New Haven: Janna Wagner ’95, All Our Kin



Janna Wagner, founder and Chief Learning Officer of All Our Kin, shares her experience founding a nonprofit in New Haven to support family childcare businesses and improve children’s early learning experiences.


Kiki Louya: A Detroit For All



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In the early 2000s, eating local was believed to be transformative for our food systems. Those changes may not have come true, but what happens when we revisit local food today—this time, emphasizing equity, coalition-building, and approaches specific to place?

Kiki Louya is a Congolese-American chef and entrepreneur who founded the all-women hospitality group, Nest Egg. Her two businesses, the Farmer’s Hand and FOLK, have flourished in Detroit, building new industry ideas for fair wages, sustainability, and equity. We chat with Kiki more on how progress for Detroit can be inclusive of all, and the relationships it takes to make these ambitions a reality.

Kiki’s visit comes as part of our “Cooking Across the Black Diaspora” series, a themed line-up for Chewing the Fat. In collaboration with the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale, and the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration, the series commemorates Black History Month, and the 50th anniversary for both the Afro-American Cultural Center and Yale Department of African American Studies.

about us:

website: https://www.sustainablefood.yale.edu/chewing-the-fat-podcast

facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram

twitter: @ysfp

instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Ep. 29 – Amanda Hitt on Why the Animal Agriculture Industry Needs Whistleblowers



In an age where almost everything we eat is produced outside of public view, whistleblowers are critical to maintaining the integrity of our food systems. These principled insiders are often the first people to warn the public — often at grave personal cost — when food is unsafe, when workers face inhumane conditions, when food labels mislead consumers, and when animals and the environment are being abused. But who defends these front-line defenders?

Our guest, attorney Amanda Hitt, has been a champion and visionary for protecting and empowering food system whistleblowers for over a decade. As the founder and director of the Government Accountability Project’s Food Integrity Campaign, Hitt’s clients have included USDA food safety inspectors in ultra-high-speed slaughterhouses, contract poultry farmers faced with exploitative contracts and company retaliation, and animal researchers privy to taxpayer-funded waste and cruelty. In addition to litigating whistleblowers’ cases, Hitt and her team work to draw public attention to these whistleblowers’ stories and to turn their revelations into systemic legal reforms. In this episode, Hitt takes us inside the world of animal agriculture industry whistleblowers. We speak with Hitt about her clients’ stories and motivations, the patchwork of laws that provide protections and redress for whistleblowers, the reality behind her video game “Bacon Defender,” and why food animal welfare, public health, and worker rights are inextricably intertwined.


Resumes 2: Electric Boogaloo



Resumes? Again? Yes! We realized that this important and large topic needs more than 1 episode, so we are back to help you draft and construct a resume worthy of your many achievements that can help you get the job you want and deserve!


Yale student-athletes on three-point shots, resilience, and the joy of basketball



Yale student-athletes Tori Andrew BF ’21 and Azar Swain TD ’21, who are among the best shooters in the Ivy League and NCAA, join President Peter Salovey for a conversation about the right mindset to lead and win—on the basketball court, in the classroom, and in life.


Paola Velez: Reimagining the Restaurant Kitchen



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For chef Paola Velez, kitchens are spaces for endless exploration. Detailed historical research and precise culinary craft come together to centerthe flavors, foods, and experiences of the Black diaspora. Sustainability isn’t a buzzword, but is a substantive set of evolving practices and values. She builds teamwork and belonging, transforming the kitchen into its own “starter”: a living, flourishing unit that gives rise to fulfilling work and lives.

Paola Velez is the executive pastry chef at the Afro-Caribbean restaurant Kith/Kin, located at the Intercontinental in Washington D.C. You can follow her and her incredible creations @smallorchids on Instagram and Twitter.

Paola’s visit comes as part of our “Cooking Across the Black Diaspora” series, a themed line-up for Chewing the Fat. In collaboration with the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale, and the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration, the series commemorates Black History Month, and the 50th anniversary for both the Afro-American Cultural Center and Yale Department of African American Studies.

about us:

website: https://www.sustainablefood.yale.edu/chewing-the-fat-podcast

facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram

twitter: @ysfp

instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Professor Joy Milligan on Plessy Preserved: Agencies and the Effective Constitution



Professor Joy Milligan talks about her recent article, Plessy Preserved: Agencies and the Effective Constitution. Federal officials enforced a “separate but equal” framework for public housing long after Brown invalidated that principle. This administrative regime wrote segregation into U.S. cities, operating as the effective Constitution for decades. This Article asks why a liberal, reformist agency chose that path—and what it teaches about administrative constitutionalism.      


A Voice for the Voiceless, with Patrick Gee



Patrick Gee, who himself underwent years of dialysis and a kidney transplant, discusses advocating for people with kidney disease, people of color, and people in his community in Virginia who lack access to care and information about their health.