All posts by yalepodcasts

Antitrust Law and the Future of the Gig Labor Market



Gig economy workers at companies like Uber and Lyft often don’t have access to labor protections like minimum wage, overtime pay, workers’ compensation, and unemployment insurance. But gig workers risk liability under antitrust laws if they attempt to organize. Author Eugene Kim and former union leader Javier Morillo join us on this episode to talk about how to overcome this barrier to organizing – and why we should.

To learn more about this topic, take a look at Eugene Kim’s Note, Labor’s Antitrust Problem: A Case for Worker Welfare, recently published in the Yale Law Journal.


Connecting Ideas and Action to Understand Racism and Reduce Disparities



In recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President Peter Salovey and Professor Phillip Atiba Goff discuss the science of racial bias, the work of the Center for Policing Equity, and the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and racial disparities.


COVID-19 Update



Ten months into the COVID-19 pandemic, Hannah and Mark give an update on the admissions office’s rapid changes to work that would normally include thousands of in-person meetings and travel around the world. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan joins to discuss updates to the selection process, sharing what changed and what stayed the same during the Admissions Committee’s first meetings to select applicants to the Yale Class of 2025.


Mythbusters



The first installment in an occasional miniseries. Admissions Officer Jill joins Mark and Hannah to discuss and debunk some of the most persistent admissions myths. The officers review six common myths, covering topics that range from early action to demonstrated interest to online message boards. For each, they discus why the myth is inaccurate while revealing the small kernel of truth at its core.


Ep. 38 – Margaret Renkl on discovering wonder, grief, and inspiration in backyard nature



In the long months we’ve all been confined to our homes, many people have become reacquainted with the vibrant life just outside their doors, finding unexpected joy, companionship, and hope through partaking in the cycles of love and loss that happen in the skies and yards around us. It is this wonder to be found in the natural world, from observing the habits of the nesting chipmunk family under her house, to watching a monarch butterfly break out of its chrysalis, that our guest, Margaret Renkl, captures so evocatively through her writing. In her book, Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss, and in her weekly opinion columns for The New York Times, Renkl introduces readers to the profound joys and sorrows unfolding in the world around us. In stories about growing up in the South, the heartbreak of losing her parents, finding the perfect squirrel-proof finch feeder, and hearing the chattering of birds in her yard as they warn of a lurking snake, she grounds the extraordinary and uplifts the everyday. In this episode, we talk with Renkl about how loving nature and mourning it go hand in hand, how backyard nature can provide comfort during times of grief, the impetuousness of squirrels, and how she turned her Nashville backyard into a wildlife sanctuary.


Students and University Library Help to Write Yale’s History



Help Us Make History—an archival project launched by the Yale University Library in May 2020—invites undergraduate, graduate, and professional students to contribute their written and visual records of life on and off campus during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this episode of Yale Talk, President Salovey learns from University Archivist Michael Lotstein about how students, faculty, staff and alumni throughout the generations have helped to write Yale’s history. Current Yale College students Solomon Adams ’24, Emma Levin ’23, and Regina Sung ’24 contribute readings from among the hundreds of submissions that the project has received to date.


Developing Skills in a Virtual Space



Another consequence of the global pandemic includes the ways by which we develop professional skills. While internships in their traditional sense still occur, these may not be as readily available to individuals for a number of reasons. Additionally, working from home and/or taking courses online has altered the ways in which students and non-students work, develop skills, and move their professional identities forward. In this episode, we talk about constructive ways you can move forward in seeking out professional experiences in a virtual space.


Virtual Networking in a Pandemic



The global pandemic has interrupted many aspects of our daily lives, and that can include aspects of your career development and preparation. Networking under ‘normal’ circumstances is often seen as troublesome enough. In this new, primarily virtual, landscape, we need to adjust our methods, but we can still push forward in developing connections, learning about career paths/industries/employers, and using that information as we prepare for applying to positions in the future.


Veterans Day: Pursuing Excellence in the Military and at Yale



Yale has a proud tradition of involvement in, and ties to, military service. Through programs including the Warrior-Scholar Project, the Yale Veterans Network, and the Yale Veterans Association, the university warmly embraces its veterans, as well as those who are actively serving in the military and those who participate in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. For this Veterans Day podcast, President Salovey talks with three undergraduates in the Eli Whitney Students Program—James Hatch ’23, Andrew Nguyen ’22, and Allegra Pankratz ’21—about serving their country and finding community at Yale.