All posts by yalepodcasts

Professor Crespo on Probable Clause Pluralism



Professor Andrew Manuel Crespo discusses his recent article, Probable Clause Pluralism. The constitutionality of a search or seizure typically depends on the connection between the target of that search or seizure and some allegation of illegal behavior—a connection assessed by asking whether the search or seizure is supported by probable cause. But as central as probable cause is to the Fourth Amendment, no one seems to know what it means or how it operates. The Supreme Court insists it is “not possible” to define the term, calling instead for the application of “common sense” to “the totality of the circumstances.” This article seeks to navigate, and resolve, this tension between doctrinal flexibility and structure. To do so, it urges a rejection of an often invoked—if not always followed—tenet of Supreme Court doctrine: probable cause unitarianism. That dominant idea holds that whatever probable cause means, it ought to entail the same basic analytic method and be judged by the same substantive standard from one case to another. But on close inspection, the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence contains seeds of an alternative, superior conception of probable cause, which this article terms probable cause pluralism. On this view, probable cause can comfortably encompass distinct analytic frameworks and substantive standards, each of which can be tailored to different Fourth Amendment events. From there, the article proposes a three-part framework for determining the constitutionality of a search or seizure, which can better equip scholars and jurists to reason through the cases to come and assess the cases that have come before.


When Black Folks live in, persist through, and thrive in nature— Outdoor Afro Founder Rue Mapp



Rue Mapp is the Founder and CEO of Outdoor Afro, a national not-for-profit organization with offices in Oakland, CA, and Washington, D.C. Rue oversees a carefully selected and trained national volunteer leadership team of nearly 90 men and women who represent 30 states around the US, and shares opportunities to build a broader community and leadership in nature. Her important work has generated widespread national recognition and support. Since Outdoor Afro’s inception in 2009 as a blog, Rue has captured the attention and support of millions through a multimedia approach that is grounded in personal connections and community organizing. From its grassroots beginning, Outdoor Afro now enjoys national sponsorship and is recognized by major organizations for its role in addressing the ongoing need for greater diversity in the outdoors. In 2010, Mapp was invited to the Obama White House to participate in the America’s Great Outdoors Conference, and subsequently to take part in a think-tank to inform the launch of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” initiative. She was appointed program officer for the Stewardship Council’s Foundation for Youth Investment to oversee its grant-making program from 2010-2012. Since that time, Mapp’s work and op-eds have been featured in publications including The Wall Street Journal, Backpacker Magazine, Seattle Times, Los Angeles Times, Ebony Magazine, Outside Magazine, Sunset Magazine, NPR, and many others. Rue’s work has also been recognized with numerous awards and distinctions, including: The Root 100 as one of the most influential African Americans in the country (2012 and 2016), Outdoor Industry Inspiration Award, National Wildlife Federation Communication award (received alongside President Bill Clinton) and Family Circle Magazine selected Rue as one of America’s 20 Most Influential Moms. Mapp remains in high demand to speak around the country and in Canada about her innovative approach that has successfully connected thousands, especially from the Black American community, to nature and the benefits of spending more time outdoors. She is proud to serve on the Outdoor Industry Association and The Wilderness Society boards. In 2014, Rue was appointed to the California State Parks Commission by Governor Jerry Brown. She was named a National Geographic fellow, and a lifetime member of Delta Sigma Theta, Incorporated. In 2020, Outdoor Afro was chosen to be highlighted and visited by Oprah on her 2020 Vision Tour. Check out details here. A graduate of UC Berkeley (with a Degree in Art History), Rue’s skills and background make her a unique voice via the leadership and programs she has instituted through her career, enlightening a diverse community to the wonders and benefits of the outdoors. Rue resides in Vallejo, CA and is the proud mother of three young adults. Want more insight on Rue? Visit www.ruemapp.com.


Yale Economic Experts on the COVID-19 Pandemic



PlayPlay

President Peter Salovey discussed the national and global economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the lessons we can learn from history with three Yale faculty experts:
Pinelopi Goldberg, Elihu Professor of Economics and professor of management and former chief economist at the World Bank Group;
Andrew Metrick, Janet L. Yellen Professor of Finance and Management and director of the Yale Program on Financial Stability; and
Robert Shiller, Sterling Professor of Economics and Nobel Laureate.

(Recorded May 20, 2020)


Study Abroad & Its Career Implications



The group talks with current Yale students to hear how their study abroad experiences informed their career decisions and how they reflect upon those experiences when drafting their resume. The unique nature of a study abroad experience lends mightily to the development of one’s professional narrative, for years to come!


Professor Gould on Law Within Congress



Professor Jonathan Gould talks about his recent article, Law Within Congress. Recognizing that procedure has long shaped how Congress operates—from bills about civil rights to tax policy to presidential impeachments—this article explores parliamentary precedent in Congress. These precedents constitute a hidden system of law that has received little scholarly attention, despite being critical to shaping what goes on in Congress. Understanding parliamentary precedent requires understanding the institutional positions of the parliamentarians, the nonpartisan officials who resolve procedural disputes. Drawing on novel interviews with parliamentarians and the legislative staffers who work closely with them, this article illuminates the intersection of law and politics in the making of parliamentary precedent. A better understanding of parliamentary precedent contributes to our understanding of how Congress operates, and the fault lines that emerge in an age of polarization and hardball. These dynamics also hold lessons for public law more broadly.


This has actually solidified my career path



Through the COVID Conversations series, YJBM is preserving the impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on graduate, medical, and professional students the world over. This series aims to share these stories in a way that underscores the unique humanity and shared experiences of graduate, medical, and professional students. Our ultimate hope is that in doing so, this series will culture a deeper sense of community.

Graduate school has a way of throwing curve balls at students, however, few students expect to completely change their research project entirely — especially during a pandemic. Mary Petrone, a PhD student in the Lab of Dr. Nathan Grubaugh at the Yale School of Public Health, did exactly that. In this conversation with Brian Thompson, a fellow PhD student at the Yale School of Public Health, she discusses the COVID-19 Pandemic and the implications that it has for her PhD research and career trajectory.


Ben Wurgaft: Meat Planet



What makes cultured meat imaginable?

Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft is a public scholar whose latest book, Meat Planet: Artificial Flesh and the Future of Food, looks deeply at this question. These days, technologies for cultured meat are kept more and more under wraps; Ben’s research then, offers an incredible glimpse at the industry. We chat about the book’s stories, but also food tech, science fiction, and what this pandemic means for meat production.

Bonus question on a cultured meat TV episode (Black Mirror, anyone?) at 33:32.

For more from Ben, follow @benwurgaft on Twitter. Meat Planet can be purchased in bookstores today.

This episode marks the end of season 2, but we’ll see you soon!

about us:

website: https://www.sustainablefood.yale.edu/chewing-the-fat-podcast

facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram

twitter: @ysfp

instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


COVID-19



As COVID-19 causes massive disruptions around the world, Hannah and Mark discuss how the Yale Admissions Office has adapted and will continue adapting to new realities for applicants, admitted students, and prospective students. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan joins as a guest to discuss how high school students should think about the selective admissions process in the face of the global pandemic.


Committee



Every admissions decision is made by a committee composed of five members of the Yale community. Hannah and Mark take listeners inside a real admissions committee discussion and describe how the members reach consensus and make decisions. Admissions Officers Jill and Alfie join as guests to discuss their roles as a committee presenter and a committee chair.


Sophie Zucker — Writer/Actress (Dickinson on Apple TV)



Live from campus — pre quarantine — Sophie tells Aaron about the unique way she got her first staff job, what happens when Tim Cook walks into a table read of your script, and how she’s navigated the beginnings of an acting resume that already includes gems like The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, The Other Two, and Dickinson.

A fascinating conversation for fans of those shows, as well as anyone interested in breaking into the TV industry.

Follow Aaron on Twitter @aarondtracy for show updates.