Self Education – Special Episode



YJBM editors Kartiga and Huaqi interview Dr. Robert Hahn, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about self-motivated education. For more information about YJBM or to read our latest issues, visit medicine.yale.edu/yjbm


Wasted: Untold Stories of Food Waste



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You’ve heard it before: over one-third of all food is never eaten. Meanwhile, one in eight families struggles with hunger. So goes the problem of food waste––an environmental, social, and moral blight that affronts our public conscience. But is all food waste created equal? What might actually be wasted in producing food? Who benefits most from campaigns against food waste? And in what ways might our zeroing in on food waste divert our attention from larger questions around how to build more resilient, nourishing, and just food systems? On this episode of Chewing the Fat, a deeper look at views less heard on the issue of food waste.

Austin Bryniarski chairs the New Haven Food Policy Council and is rooted in community-based food justice efforts. He has worked for the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic, the Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy at UCLA, the Yale Sustainable Food Program and more recently, Urban Resources Initiative. He holds a Masters in Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, having chaired the Yale Food Systems Symposium and taught for the Environmental Protection Clinic during his candidacy.

Max Elder is a Research Director in the Food Futures Lab at the Institute for the Future. Max has led work around the world with food companies like Barilla, Hershey’s, and Campbell’s, major foundations like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; and innovative technology companies like Google and Intel. He sits on the advisory boards of Food Shot Global and Food Systems for the Future.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Resumania



We all know that resumes are important to a job search, but why? What is our goal as we construct it and what expectations should we assume on behalf of the reader? The group tackles a number of the classic, and not-so-classic, frustrations regarding this all-important document.


9,000 Short of the 10,000 Hour Rule: The Perils of “Professional Experience”



In this inaugural episode, the gang mulls over what makes experience “professional”. They also discuss how we have more agency over the ways in which we frame past experiences than we might initially believe! Listen as the group touches on a number of ways you can reminder yourself that experience is in the eye of the beholder (no, really!)


Teresa Mares: Life on the Other Border



Facing hunger and labor challenges, Latinx farmworkers in Vermont have still found ways to provide for themselves and their families—all while propping up the state’s dairy industry. University of Vermont Associate Professor Teresa Mares explores these stories of resilience in her recent book, Life on the Other Border: Farm Workers and Food Justice in Vermont. This archival episode features Teresa sharing about her book’s early workings, paying special attention to Vermont’s complex landscape for food activism. Plus, notes on how food scholarship is changing, and how it can help inform policy for those that need it most.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


8. (LIVE) Real Talk with Yale’s Diversity and Inclusion Professionals: Representatives from across the campus share lessons, frustrations, and opportunities



Taryn Wolf is the Director of Academic Administration at the Yale School of Art. Taryn joined the Yale School of Art in February, coming from the New School where she was senior director of recruitment and outreach. Before that she held positions at MICA, CalArts, and the School of Visual Arts. Taryn also holds a BFA from MICA. In her new role, Taryn will provide strategic leadership for the Office of Academic Administration—working with the directors of the school’s graduate and undergraduate program areas and the director of finance and administration in order to coordinate the administrative activities relating to the academic policies, procedures, and programs of the School of Art, including alumni relations and student career services.

Darin Latimore is the Deputy Dean and Chief Diversity Officer and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine) at the Yale School of Medicine. Prior to Yale, Darin served as the associate dean for student and resident diversity at the University of California-Davis School of Medicine, where he oversaw medical student and resident diversity programs. He developed initiatives to increase the pipeline of socio-economically disadvantaged students, residents, and faculty and has spearheaded programs to support and empower underrepresented students who are interested in attending medical school.

At UC Davis, Latimore helped expand the definition of diversity beyond African-American, Hispanic, and Native American individuals to include underrepresented Asian-American groups and individuals who are economically disadvantaged. Today, approximately 43% of UC Davis medical students fall into one of these categories. He has served as chair or an active member on numerous committees, task forces, and local, state and national working groups dedicated to diversity, equal opportunity, and medical education. He also maintains a clinical practice caring for patients with HIV/AIDS at the Center of AIDS Research, Education, and Services.

Chantal Rodriguez is the Associate Dean of Yale School of Drama. She served as Assistant Dean of the school for the 2016-2017 academic year. From 2009-2016 she worked as the Programming Director and Literary Manager of the Latino Theater Company, operators of the Los Angeles Theatre Center (LATC), a multi-theater complex in downtown L.A. At the LATC, she helped produce many seasons of culturally diverse work including the historic Encuentro 2014 festival. As a scholar with a specialization in U.S. Latinx Theater, she has lectured at the University of California Los Angeles, Emerson College Los Angeles, Loyola Marymount University, California State University at Northridge, and California Institute for the Arts. Her work has been published in Theatre Journal, Latin American Theatre Review, e-misférica and Theatre Research International. In 2011, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press published her monograph, “The Latino Theatre Initiative/Center Theatre Group Papers,” which was nominated for three Latino Literacy Now International Book Awards. She is an active member of the Latinx Theatre Commons Steering Committee, a recipient of the Los Angeles Women’s Theatre Festival’s 2016 Rainbow Award, and was recognized as a Young Leader of Color by TCG in 2011. She is a graduate of UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television where she earned a Ph.D. in Theatre and Performance Studies, and Santa Clara University where she earned a B.A. in Theater and Spanish Studies.


Ep. 22 – Ferris Jabr on reviving the Gaia hypothesis



In the 1970s, scientists proposed what has become known as the Gaia Hypothesis: the idea that earth is best understood not as a passive substrate or background to life but as a life form in its own right. Our guest, journalist Ferris Jabr, believes the time has come to revive that idea. To understand how sentient creatures have evolved on this planet, he suggests, is not only to grasp that animals—human and otherwise—are offshoots of an evolutionary tree; it’s to see the tree itself as one element of a dynamic, interrelated organism. We speak with Jabr about the art of science reporting, the limits of life, and what the white cliffs of Dover are made of.


7. Raised By Animals: Dr. Jennifer Verdolin outlines the interconnectedness of the human ecosystem and the animal kingdom



JENNIFER L. VERDOLIN is an Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona and an expert in animal behavior. The author of two books, including Wild Connection: What Animal Courtship and Mating Tell Us About Human Relationships and Raised by Animals: The Surprising New Science of Animal Family Dynamics, she draws on animal behavior to reveal how much we can learn from other species to improve our relationships, families, and lives. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, NPR, Slate, The Washington Post, and National Geographic. Jennifer was a featured guest on the D.L. Hughley Show from 2014-2018 and is a frequent media guest on other radio and podcast shows. She enjoys engaging the public and speaks at places like the 92nd St Y and universities around the country. She also consults for television production companies in the US and abroad.


6. You Actually Work Together?: Hosts of the “Political Climate” Podcast on what it’s like to spend every day working across the aisle



Political Climate is a bipartisan podcast on energy and environmental politics in America, presented by the USC Schwarzenegger Institute and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. Political Climate goes beyond the echo chambers to bring you civil conversations, fierce debates and insider perspectives, with hosts and guests from across the political spectrum. Join Democrat and Republican energy experts Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton, along with Greentech Media’s Julia Pyper, as we explore how energy and environment policies get made.