6. You Actually Work Together?: Hosts of the “Political Climate” Podcast on what it’s like to spend every day working across the aisle



Political Climate is a bipartisan podcast on energy and environmental politics in America, presented by the USC Schwarzenegger Institute and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. Political Climate goes beyond the echo chambers to bring you civil conversations, fierce debates and insider perspectives, with hosts and guests from across the political spectrum. Join Democrat and Republican energy experts Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton, along with Greentech Media’s Julia Pyper, as we explore how energy and environment policies get made.


5. When Jay-Z Meets Green Trees: Heartwood Producer Chris Perkins talks about the role of music in defining an environmental ethic



Chris Perkins is a joint-degree M.E.M. and M.B.A. candidate at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Yale School of Management from Seattle, WA. His professional interests include standards for stewardship of natural resources, supply chain management, green finance, public-private community conservation partnerships, and next-generation environmental leadership. Most recently, he lived in Jackson, WY, where he worked at the Center for Jackson Hole, the nonprofit responsible for the SHIFT Festival, an exploration of outdoor recreation, conservation, and public health. At FES, he is the founder of Outdoor Rec Industry Student Interest Group, and produces the Heartwood Podcast alongside Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion Thomas Easley. He also provides logistical support to the Outdoor CEO Diversity Pledge.


New Haven’s Own: Ital Eating & Lady Lager



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It’s about more than just business. Ninth Square Market Too Caribbean Style and Rhythm Brewing Co. are two of many black-owned businesses in New Haven drawing from history and family traditions to provide delicious food and drink for local communities. Ninth-Square owner Elisha Hazel and Rhythm Brewing Co. founder Alisa Mercado share about overcoming challenges in the industry, the nuances of sustainability, and their efforts to bring people together––around the table and the pint.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


4. Young, Black, and Sustainable: Jarami Bond tells us why carpet is a hidden secret of environmental solutions



Featured as a 2017 GreenBiz 30 Under 30 emerging leader in sustainable business, Jarami Bond develops strategy, crafts communications, and leverages the power of storytelling to help mission-driven brands unlock business growth opportunities, build brand awareness, cultivate healthy company culture, and maximize positive impact. In his free time, he uses his voice, keyboard, and cameras to tell meaningful stories and better the lives of others.

Currently, Jarami serves as A&D Market Manager at Teknion.
From 2015-2019, Jarami served as the Sustainability Strategy Manager at Interface Americas, a globally-recognized sustainability leader and the world’s largest manufacturer of commercial carpet tile.

Jarami supported the advancement of Interface’s mission through strategic customer engagement and business development. He spoke at customer-facing events and conferences, sharing Interface’s sustainability story to differentiate and inspire. Jarami also worked
with Marketing and Global Communications to develop sales tools and facilitate technical trainings that equipped account executives to leverage Interface’s sustainability progress to stimulate marketplace advantage.

Jarami also created pathways for employees to connect deeply to company vision and values and make positive impacts by curating internal communications, developing employee engagement programs, and supporting diversity and inclusion strategy.

Jarami is a graduate of North Carolina State University with a B.S. in Environmental Science with a focus on Sustainable Materials and Technology. While at NC State, he scored three engineering internships with the NC Department of Transportation and a sustainability
internship with the City of Raleigh Office of Sustainability.


Clocks and Cycles Episode 2



In the second episode for YJBM’s Clocks and Cycles Issue, Huaqi and Wei interview Xiaoyong Yang, an expert on the interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism. For more information about YJBM or to read the Clocks and Cycles issue, visit medicine.yale.edu/yjbm


3. A Leader of Forestry: Sam Cook talks about his non-traditional path to success in forestry



Sam Cook is the Executive Director of Forest Asset for the NC State College of Natural Resources and VP for the Natural Resources Foundation Board. He is the former Director of Forestry for the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation in the Lowcountry (Charleston) of South Carolina and has maintained a Consulting Forestry business since 2007 in North and South Carolina. Prior to this work, Sam served in several managerial positions for International Paper Company’s Forest Resources Division for over 15 years. He has worked for Duke Energy in Durham, NC for nine years and started his forestry career with the USDA Forest Service Intermountain Forest and Range Experimental Station in Boise, ID. Sam completed an A.S. in Forestry from Tuskegee University in 1981 and a B.S. in Forest Management from NC State University in 1984.


2. The Challenges of Leadership: Dean Indy Burke connects her story to the challenges of leading one of the best environmental schools in the country



Ingrid C. “Indy” Burke is the Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. She is an ecosystem ecologist whose work has focused on carbon and nitrogen cycling in semi-arid rangeland ecosystems and the effects of land management and climate variability on these systems. A respected educator and intellectual leader in the U.S. and internationally, she is particularly interested in fostering interdisciplinary scholarship.


Ep. 21 – David Barrie on the wonders of animal navigation



Author and sailor David Barrie voyaged around the globe and through scientific literature to learn about the awe-inducing and still mysterious navigational powers of animals. Barrie writes of mysteries such as how birds employ “map and compass” type navigation, how Box jellyfish use some of their twenty-four eyes to keep track of trees and other above-water landmarks, how sweat bees can detect and find their ways home using single photons of light, and how Sahara desert ants measure their turns and count their steps in a process humans call “dead reckoning” — in addition to relying on visual landmarks, patterns of light invisible to the human eye, wind micro-vibrations, scent, optic flow, and the earth’s magnetic field. Animals’ navigational feats reveal an extraordinary awareness of the environment around them — a form of perception that is often far different from our own. In his new book, Supernavigators, Barrie describes the navigational intelligences of other species, which often exceed our wildest imaginations, and issues a call for humans, too often “blinded by vision,” to better respect and celebrate these animals’ abilities in an era when human behavior is increasingly impeding them.


Alexandra Cuerdo: Filipino-America is in the Food



How can film tell the stories of people and their cuisines? Their histories and identities? Alexandra “Allie” Cuerdo is the director of ULAM: Main Dish, the first documentary following how chefs and restaurants are building a powerful Filipino food movement across the U.S. We chat about the diversity of cuisine from the Philippines, and how its transformation in America helps us better understand narratives of Filipino immigration and generational change. Plus, notes on Asian-American media representation.

Episode title inspired by Carlos Bulosan’s “America is in the Heart.”

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


1. Alabama to Connecticut: Easley’s path from backyard garden to hip-hop forestry and deanship at FES



Dr. Thomas RaShad Easley has spent most of his career as a diversity professional. As a diversity professional he has focused on the recruitment, retention of diverse talent in natural resource disciplines. Easley earned his undergraduate degree in Forest Science from Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical (A&M) University; his master’s degree in Forest Genetics is from Iowa State University; and his doctorate in Adult Education is from NC State University. Easley is the Assistant Dean of Community and Inclusion in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. In this role, he assists with enhancing diversity by promoting access to education for all people, and developing scholarly/relevant programming around workplace equity. Now, as a diversity professional, Easley leverages his background in forestry/genetics/education to teach community workshops, course lectures, and provide diversity facilitation to his place of employment as well as to others that he mentors. In conclusion, with all of Easley’s academic experience he credits being an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America as part of his success. He is a forester and that has contributed to his vocational and scientific success. He is a former campus pastor and he credits that for teaching him how to work with people. Lastly, Dr. Easley is also a musician and is known as RaShad Eas in the world of music. His art is called “Save Your Life Music” because he puts a message of love, embracing self and helping others in his music.