22: Ukrainian Ideas in the 21st Century



Class 22 brings us closer to the modern day and looks at the role of culture.

Timothy Snyder is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He speaks five and reads ten European languages.

Ukraine must have existed as a society and polity on 23 February 2022, else Ukrainians would not have collectively resisted Russian invasion the next day. What does it mean for a nation to exist? Is this a matter of structures, actions, or both? Why has the existence of Ukraine occasioned such controversy? In what ways are Polish, Russian, and Jewish self-understanding dependent upon experiences in Ukraine? Just how and when did a modern Ukrainian nation emerge? For that matter, how does any modern nation emerge? Why some and not others? Can nations be chosen, and can choices be decisive? If so, whose, and how? Ukraine was the country most touched by Soviet and Nazi terror: what can we learn about those systems, then, from Ukraine? Is the post-colonial, multilingual Ukrainian nation a holdover from the past, or does it hold some promise for the future?

Course reading list
Video version of this course available on YouTube.


21: Comparative Russian Imperialism



Class 21 features guest lecturer, Professor Arne Westad, comparing Russian imperialism with other empires in recent centuries.

Timothy Snyder is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He speaks five and reads ten European languages.

Ukraine must have existed as a society and polity on 23 February 2022, else Ukrainians would not have collectively resisted Russian invasion the next day. What does it mean for a nation to exist? Is this a matter of structures, actions, or both? Why has the existence of Ukraine occasioned such controversy? In what ways are Polish, Russian, and Jewish self-understanding dependent upon experiences in Ukraine? Just how and when did a modern Ukrainian nation emerge? For that matter, how does any modern nation emerge? Why some and not others? Can nations be chosen, and can choices be decisive? If so, whose, and how? Ukraine was the country most touched by Soviet and Nazi terror: what can we learn about those systems, then, from Ukraine? Is the post-colonial, multilingual Ukrainian nation a holdover from the past, or does it hold some promise for the future?

Course reading list
Video version of this course available on YouTube.


Craft & Career: Lisa Kereszi, MFA ’00, photographer, professor, Art DUS Yale School of Art – Part 1



The Craft & Career series connects with professional creatives from the arts, entertainment, and media industries, to discuss the nuances of their craft, the reality of their careers, and how, in often surprising ways, these two concerns can work together.

The first half of our conversation with Lisa Kereszi MFA ’00, photographer, educator, and DUS for the Yale School of Art.
More on Lisa Kereszi: www.lisakereszi.com/

OCS Craft & Career Podcast (full episode list) – ocs.yale.edu/podcast


20: Maidan and Self-Understanding with guest lecturer Marci Shore



What can be that breaking point in a person’s life? Class 20 brings us to Maidan and the Self-Understanding that resulted. Guest lecturer is Marci Shore, Associate Professor of History at Yale University.

Marci Shore, Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2018.

Timothy Snyder is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He speaks five and reads ten European languages.

Ukraine must have existed as a society and polity on 23 February 2022, else Ukrainians would not have collectively resisted Russian invasion the next day. What does it mean for a nation to exist? Is this a matter of structures, actions, or both? Why has the existence of Ukraine occasioned such controversy? In what ways are Polish, Russian, and Jewish self-understanding dependent upon experiences in Ukraine? Just how and when did a modern Ukrainian nation emerge? For that matter, how does any modern nation emerge? Why some and not others? Can nations be chosen, and can choices be decisive? If so, whose, and how? Ukraine was the country most touched by Soviet and Nazi terror: what can we learn about those systems, then, from Ukraine? Is the post-colonial, multilingual Ukrainian nation a holdover from the past, or does it hold some promise for the future?

Course reading list
Video version of this course available on YouTube.


19: Oligarchies in Russia and Ukraine



Class 19 brings additional reminders of the impact Poland had on the formation of the Ukrainian state.

Timothy Snyder is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He speaks five and reads ten European languages.

Ukraine must have existed as a society and polity on 23 February 2022, else Ukrainians would not have collectively resisted Russian invasion the next day. What does it mean for a nation to exist? Is this a matter of structures, actions, or both? Why has the existence of Ukraine occasioned such controversy? In what ways are Polish, Russian, and Jewish self-understanding dependent upon experiences in Ukraine? Just how and when did a modern Ukrainian nation emerge? For that matter, how does any modern nation emerge? Why some and not others? Can nations be chosen, and can choices be decisive? If so, whose, and how? Ukraine was the country most touched by Soviet and Nazi terror: what can we learn about those systems, then, from Ukraine? Is the post-colonial, multilingual Ukrainian nation a holdover from the past, or does it hold some promise for the future?

Course reading list
Video version of this course available on YouTube.


Introducing Professor Payvand Ahdout, YLJ’s Emerging Scholar of the Year



In this episode, Vol. 131’s Editor-in-Chief, Rachel Sommers, and Executive Editor for Features & Book Reviews, Bapu Kotapati, speak with the Yale Law Journal’s inaugural Emerging Scholar of the Year: Professor Payvand Ahdout. The Emerging Scholar of the Year Award celebrates the achievements of early-career academics who have made significant contributions to legal thought and scholarship. Professor Ahdout is currently an Associate Professor of Law at The University of Virginia School of Law, where she teaches Federal Courts and a seminar on the Separation of Powers. Her scholarship uncovers judicial practices and procedures that have important implications for our understanding of federal courts as critical fora for the vindication of constitutional rights. In this wide-ranging conversation, Professor Adhout speaks about the formative professional and academic experiences of her career, discusses her scholarship and pedagogical style, shares her practical advice for law students, and answers questions from the Yale Law community.