Monthly Archives: September 2013

What Happens in the Arctic Doesn’t Stay in the Arctic: A Conversation with Fran Ulmer



Many scientists note that the poles offer a preview of climate change’s expected global impacts. In the first of a two-part podcast, Fran Ulmer, chair of the US Arctic Research Commission and former lieutenant governor of Alaska, discusses her work in the Arctic and how the people who live and work there are facing the challenges posed by a changing climate.


Offshore Drilling in the Arctic: A Conversation with Fran Ulmer



Offshore drilling in the Arctic is a contentious topic, especially in light of the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. In the second of a two-part podcast, Fran Ulmer, chair of the US Arctic Research Commission and former lieutenant governor of Alaska, discusses her experience as a member of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, appointed by President Obama, and offers some perspective on the debate surrounding natural resource extraction, of all types, in Alaska.


Frederick Kaufman: Talking Corporate Greed, Part Three



Mark Bomford, Director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project, sits down with journalist Frederick Kaufman, author of “Bet the Farm: How Food Stopped Being Food”, for an exploration on the effects that globalization, commoditization, and corporate greed have on our food system and the way that food is produced.


Frederick Kaufman: Talking Corporate Greed



Mark Bomford, Director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project, sits down with journalist Frederick Kaufman, author of “Bet the Farm: How Food Stopped Being Food”, for an exploration on the effects that globalization, commoditization, and corporate greed have on our food system and the way that food is produced.


Frederick Kaufman: Talking Corporate Greed, Part Two



Mark Bomford, Director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project, sits down with journalist Frederick Kaufman, author of “Bet the Farm: How Food Stopped Being Food”, for an exploration on the effects that globalization, commoditization, and corporate greed have on our food system and the way that food is produced.


Eating Invaders (and Other Strategies for Managing Invasive Species)



To the untrained eye, invasive species blend into the environment, so unless they are incredibly ugly (snakehead anyone?) — or trendy (bacon-wrapped wild boar chops?) — they’re not often a topic of conversation. But invasive species, from bamboo and eucalyptus to Asian carp and zebra mussels, disrupt their environments and have serious ecological impacts. In this podcast, Josh Galperin, associate director of the Yale Center of Environmental Law & Policy, and Connie Vogelmann, Yale Law School ’14, discuss invasive species management, highlighting one troubling trend — eating invaders — that may have unintended consequences.


Reporting on Energy and the Environment: a Conversation with Kate Galbraith



In the first of a two-part podcast, Kate Galbraith, an energy and environment reporter formerly with the Texas Tribune, visits with Center research assistant Rachel Lipstein about environmental journalism, her recently released book, The Great Texas Wind Rush, and the key environmental issues she covered in Texas, including water use and energy.