Monthly Archives: February 2019

Michael Rauch is back! – TV Creator, Showrunner



To Live & Dialogue’s first-ever returning guest! Join Aaron and Michael in front of a packed crowd in New Haven to discuss Michael’s prolific career. A successful TV Creator and Showrunner, Michael’s current series is the CBS drama “Instinct,” starring Alan Cumming, which returns for its second season next month. Michael speaks about the nuts and bolts of running a network show, his thoughts on directing, casting, and much much more.


Cynthia Estlund on What We Should Do After Work



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Will advances in robotics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning put vast swaths of the labor force out of work or into fierce competition for the jobs that remain? Or, as in the past, will new jobs absorb workers displaced by automation? On this episode of the Yale Law Journal Podcast, co-hosts Cody Poplin and Emily Shire interview Professor Cynthia Estlund about her recently published Article, What Should We Do After Work? Automation and Employment Law, which tackles this topic head on. The Article argues that these questions have profound implications for the fortress of rights and benefits that has been constructed on the foundation of the employment relationship, and it charts a path for reforming that body of law in the face of justified anxiety and uncertainty about the future effect of automation on jobs.


Ep. 10 – Dale Jamieson on love and meaning in the age of humans



In their book, Love in the Anthropocene, our guest, the environmental philosopher Dale Jamieson, and his co-author Bonnie Nadzam invite us to imagine a not-too-distant-future in which our technologies have continued to transform the face of the planet. In this world, the “sixth extinction” is long underway. Like the cities of today, rivers, lakes, forests, oceans, and fields are curated and managed by humans. Other animals remain only insofar as their existence contributes to human enjoyment. Most of them are bioengineered. We speak with Jamieson about the spiritual costs of this “narcissist’s playground,” and what we can do to preempt it.


Emily Nussbaum – Pulitzer Prize Winning TV Critic at The New Yorker



Emily is one of the sharpest, most innovative, most influential TV critics working today. She’s the TV critic at The New Yorker, and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for criticism.

Emily was kind enough to shlep up to New Haven where she spoke to Aaron’s class, then did a larger Q&A on stage, answering questions about her career, her process, her run-ins with the TV creators she’s reviewed, and her thoughts on the current state of TV writing.


Ep. 9 – Being Charles Foster being a beast



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What is it like to be another creature? What is it like to see, smell, hear, taste and feel the world as a different animal? Our guest today, the spectacularly imaginative writer and explorer Dr. Charles Foster wanted to find out. So, he got down on all fours and tried his best to do just that, living for weeks at a time as a badger, an otter, an urban fox, a deer and a swift. In this episode, Dr. Foster speaks about his adventures in non-humanness, how inhabiting the sensory world of other animals expanded his empathy, the shamanic quality of good nature writing, and his ambition to use language to subvert language itself. His explorations of mind and body are chronicled in his daring, hilarious and award-winning book, “Being a Beast: Adventures Across the Species Divide.”


Ecology and Evolution: Episode II



Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine podcast hosts, Amelia Hallworth and Kelsie Cassell provide a broad overview of the topics of ecology and evolution and highlight some of the research published in YJBM’s December 2018 issue focusing on Ecology and Evolution.