Monthly Archives: June 2019

Stephany Folsom Redux! – Toy Story 4 Screenwriter



With Toy Story 4 just released, we’re reposting our great conversation with screenwriter Stephany Folsom.

Stephany explains the multi year process of screenwriting at Pixar, working with animators, what it’s like on the Pixar campus, and the responsibility she feels to the billion dollar franchise.


Ep. 19 – Robert Macfarlane on being good ancestors across deep time



“Books, like landscapes, leave their marks in us,” Robert Macfarlane once wrote. “Certain books, though, like certain landscapes, stay with us even when we left them, changing not just our weathers but our climates.” Macfarlane’s writing has done this for us and for millions of readers. It has shifted our climates for the better, deepened our sympathies, expanded our understanding of and attention to our moral and physical landscapes, and reminded us of the stakes of being alive. In this episode, Macfarlane joins us to speak about his new book, Underland: A Deep Time Journey. In the book, Macfarlane explores how we humans shape value across expanses of “deep time” — geological time in which the units of measurement are eons and epochs, not days or years — and asks: Are we being good ancestors? “When viewed in deep time, things come alive that seemed inert,” he writes. “New responsibilities declare themselves. A conviviality of being leaps to mind and eye. The world becomes eerily various and vibrant again. Ice breathes. Rock has tides. Mountains ebb and flow. Stone pulses. We live on a restless earth.”


Samin Nosrat: Discovering Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat



Samin Nosrat’s Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is now a best-selling, James Beard award-winning cookbook, also turned Netflix series. Dive into Samin’s creative process as she was still writing the book back in 2015: her inspirations, doubts, collaborations, and hopes for writing something timeless. Plus, Samin shares more on what culinary stardom doesn’t tell us, and how we can reclaim cooking at home, judgment free.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Ep. 18 — Anthony Weston on animals, aliens and the silence of the universe



In 1950, a physicist posed the question that has come to be known as the Fermi Paradox: given the high mathematical probability that other intelligent life forms exist elsewhere in the universe, why is there no evidence that they exist? In his blazingly original paper, “Radio Astronomy as Epistemology,” our guest, philosopher Anthony Weston, formulates a solution. What we take to be the silence of the universe, he writes, may teach us more about ourselves—and the challenges of receptivity to nonhuman minds in general—than about the prevalence of other life. The reason the universe appears to offer no evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence, Weston suggests, may be that we are paying the wrong kind of attention. We speak with Dr. Weston about self-fulfilling prophesies, the limits of animal intelligence tests, and how to cultivate what he calls “receptive listening.”


Karima Moyer-Nocchi: Italian Foodways and the Myth of Authenticity



Pasta. Olive oil. Polenta. Much of Italian cuisine today has come to be defined by staples like these and their associated dishes (with strict recipes and rules to boot!). Yet how did we arrive at these ideas? Karima Moyer-Nocchi is a food historian who looks at the development of the Italian culinary landscape. She discusses how the traditions of “authentic Italian cuisine” are more cultural invention than fact, revealing that beliefs about authenticity erase—rather than enrich—the stories of what people cooked and ate across modern Italian history. Also, a word on immigration in Roman history, and the possible (in)coherency of the Mediterranean Diet.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Was Jesus a Revolutionary?



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Professor Erika Helgen discusses how liberation theology combines religion with politics, its idea that Jesus was a political revolutionary, and whether Pope Francis supports the movement.