Monthly Archives: July 2019

1. Alabama to Connecticut: Easley’s path from backyard garden to hip-hop forestry and deanship at FES



Dr. Thomas RaShad Easley has spent most of his career as a diversity professional. As a diversity professional he has focused on the recruitment, retention of diverse talent in natural resource disciplines. Easley earned his undergraduate degree in Forest Science from Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical (A&M) University; his master’s degree in Forest Genetics is from Iowa State University; and his doctorate in Adult Education is from NC State University. Easley is the Assistant Dean of Community and Inclusion in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. In this role, he assists with enhancing diversity by promoting access to education for all people, and developing scholarly/relevant programming around workplace equity. Now, as a diversity professional, Easley leverages his background in forestry/genetics/education to teach community workshops, course lectures, and provide diversity facilitation to his place of employment as well as to others that he mentors. In conclusion, with all of Easley’s academic experience he credits being an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America as part of his success. He is a forester and that has contributed to his vocational and scientific success. He is a former campus pastor and he credits that for teaching him how to work with people. Lastly, Dr. Easley is also a musician and is known as RaShad Eas in the world of music. His art is called “Save Your Life Music” because he puts a message of love, embracing self and helping others in his music.


Leah Penniman: A Food Justice Movement for All



PlayPlay

In our public conversation with farmer and activist Leah Penniman, we listen to her tell the powerful story of Soul Fire Farm, as told in her book, Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land. She shares with us on uncovering truth with language, how Afro-indigenous communities have influenced sustainable agriculture, and the spiritual work in healing peoples’ relationships to land. An audience Q&A follows, featuring a message of hope to inspire food sovereignty movements for generations to come.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Special episode: YJBM turns 90



To celebrate the Yale Journal of Biology & Medicine’s 90th anniversary, the outgoing editor-in-chief and managing editor discuss the value of YJBM and reflect on its history with YJBM’s faculty advisor, Professor Jeffrey Bender, and Yale School of Medicine’s Deputy Dean for Education, Dean Richard Belitsky. To find out more about YJBM, please visit our website at yjbm.yale.edu. To support other student-run, scientific journals, please also check out the Georgetown Medical Review at gmr.georgetown.edu.


Ep. 20 – Gabriela Cowperthwaite on the legacy of “Blackfish”



Film director and producer Gabriela Cowperthwaite did not set out to make a film that would force a national moral reckoning over how we keep whales in captivity, slash the profits of Sea World, and make her the unexpected enemy number one of a multi-billion dollar industry. But that’s what happened. Her acclaimed film Blackfish tells the thrilling and heartbreaking story of Tilikum, an orca whale who killed three people while in captivity. Shot on a budget of just $76,000 and released in 2010, Blackfish has been viewed by more than 60 million people and has become one of the most impactful documentary films of all time. In the six years since its release, Sea World has ended its orca breeding program and pledged to phase out orca shows all together by the end of 2019. We speak with Gabriela about the making of Blackfish, the hazards of keeping cetaceans captive, and how her film catapulted her to the frontier of marine animal activism.


Savi Horne: Shaping Land Justice Today



How are movements for land ownership changing across the American South? In this week’s episode, Savi Horne, Director of the Land Loss Prevention Project, speaks to how demographic changes, recent legislation, and new cooperative models are affecting how we envision the future of land tenure. How might coalition-building around land—historic and contemporary—advance social and environmental justice for all?

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


Clocks and Cycles Episode 1



Do you feel like you get sick more often when you aren’t getting enough sleep or when you travel overseas? There might be a reason for that! For the first episode based on YJBM’s Clocks and Cycles issue, join the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine hosts, Amelia and Lisa, as they interview Dr. Silver about his work on how the circadian clock impacts your immune system. For more information about YJBM or to read the Clocks and Cycles issue, visit medicine.yale.edu/yjbm