Monthly Archives: August 2019

Teresa Mares: Life on the Other Border



Facing hunger and labor challenges, Latinx farmworkers in Vermont have still found ways to provide for themselves and their families—all while propping up the state’s dairy industry. University of Vermont Associate Professor Teresa Mares explores these stories of resilience in her recent book, Life on the Other Border: Farm Workers and Food Justice in Vermont. This archival episode features Teresa sharing about her book’s early workings, paying special attention to Vermont’s complex landscape for food activism. Plus, notes on how food scholarship is changing, and how it can help inform policy for those that need it most.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


8. (LIVE) Real Talk with Yale’s Diversity and Inclusion Professionals: Representatives from across the campus share lessons, frustrations, and opportunities



Taryn Wolf is the Director of Academic Administration at the Yale School of Art. Taryn joined the Yale School of Art in February, coming from the New School where she was senior director of recruitment and outreach. Before that she held positions at MICA, CalArts, and the School of Visual Arts. Taryn also holds a BFA from MICA. In her new role, Taryn will provide strategic leadership for the Office of Academic Administration—working with the directors of the school’s graduate and undergraduate program areas and the director of finance and administration in order to coordinate the administrative activities relating to the academic policies, procedures, and programs of the School of Art, including alumni relations and student career services.

Darin Latimore is the Deputy Dean and Chief Diversity Officer and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine) at the Yale School of Medicine. Prior to Yale, Darin served as the associate dean for student and resident diversity at the University of California-Davis School of Medicine, where he oversaw medical student and resident diversity programs. He developed initiatives to increase the pipeline of socio-economically disadvantaged students, residents, and faculty and has spearheaded programs to support and empower underrepresented students who are interested in attending medical school.

At UC Davis, Latimore helped expand the definition of diversity beyond African-American, Hispanic, and Native American individuals to include underrepresented Asian-American groups and individuals who are economically disadvantaged. Today, approximately 43% of UC Davis medical students fall into one of these categories. He has served as chair or an active member on numerous committees, task forces, and local, state and national working groups dedicated to diversity, equal opportunity, and medical education. He also maintains a clinical practice caring for patients with HIV/AIDS at the Center of AIDS Research, Education, and Services.

Chantal Rodriguez is the Associate Dean of Yale School of Drama. She served as Assistant Dean of the school for the 2016-2017 academic year. From 2009-2016 she worked as the Programming Director and Literary Manager of the Latino Theater Company, operators of the Los Angeles Theatre Center (LATC), a multi-theater complex in downtown L.A. At the LATC, she helped produce many seasons of culturally diverse work including the historic Encuentro 2014 festival. As a scholar with a specialization in U.S. Latinx Theater, she has lectured at the University of California Los Angeles, Emerson College Los Angeles, Loyola Marymount University, California State University at Northridge, and California Institute for the Arts. Her work has been published in Theatre Journal, Latin American Theatre Review, e-misférica and Theatre Research International. In 2011, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press published her monograph, “The Latino Theatre Initiative/Center Theatre Group Papers,” which was nominated for three Latino Literacy Now International Book Awards. She is an active member of the Latinx Theatre Commons Steering Committee, a recipient of the Los Angeles Women’s Theatre Festival’s 2016 Rainbow Award, and was recognized as a Young Leader of Color by TCG in 2011. She is a graduate of UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television where she earned a Ph.D. in Theatre and Performance Studies, and Santa Clara University where she earned a B.A. in Theater and Spanish Studies.


Ep. 22 – Ferris Jabr on reviving the Gaia hypothesis



In the 1970s, scientists proposed what has become known as the Gaia Hypothesis: the idea that earth is best understood not as a passive substrate or background to life but as a life form in its own right. Our guest, journalist Ferris Jabr, believes the time has come to revive that idea. To understand how sentient creatures have evolved on this planet, he suggests, is not only to grasp that animals—human and otherwise—are offshoots of an evolutionary tree; it’s to see the tree itself as one element of a dynamic, interrelated organism. We speak with Jabr about the art of science reporting, the limits of life, and what the white cliffs of Dover are made of.


7. Raised By Animals: Dr. Jennifer Verdolin outlines the interconnectedness of the human ecosystem and the animal kingdom



JENNIFER L. VERDOLIN is an Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona and an expert in animal behavior. The author of two books, including Wild Connection: What Animal Courtship and Mating Tell Us About Human Relationships and Raised by Animals: The Surprising New Science of Animal Family Dynamics, she draws on animal behavior to reveal how much we can learn from other species to improve our relationships, families, and lives. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, NPR, Slate, The Washington Post, and National Geographic. Jennifer was a featured guest on the D.L. Hughley Show from 2014-2018 and is a frequent media guest on other radio and podcast shows. She enjoys engaging the public and speaks at places like the 92nd St Y and universities around the country. She also consults for television production companies in the US and abroad.


6. You Actually Work Together?: Hosts of the “Political Climate” Podcast on what it’s like to spend every day working across the aisle



Political Climate is a bipartisan podcast on energy and environmental politics in America, presented by the USC Schwarzenegger Institute and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. Political Climate goes beyond the echo chambers to bring you civil conversations, fierce debates and insider perspectives, with hosts and guests from across the political spectrum. Join Democrat and Republican energy experts Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton, along with Greentech Media’s Julia Pyper, as we explore how energy and environment policies get made.


5. When Jay-Z Meets Green Trees: Heartwood Producer Chris Perkins talks about the role of music in defining an environmental ethic



Chris Perkins is a joint-degree M.E.M. and M.B.A. candidate at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Yale School of Management from Seattle, WA. His professional interests include standards for stewardship of natural resources, supply chain management, green finance, public-private community conservation partnerships, and next-generation environmental leadership. Most recently, he lived in Jackson, WY, where he worked at the Center for Jackson Hole, the nonprofit responsible for the SHIFT Festival, an exploration of outdoor recreation, conservation, and public health. At FES, he is the founder of Outdoor Rec Industry Student Interest Group, and produces the Heartwood Podcast alongside Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion Thomas Easley. He also provides logistical support to the Outdoor CEO Diversity Pledge.


New Haven’s Own: Ital Eating & Lady Lager



PlayPlay

It’s about more than just business. Ninth Square Market Too Caribbean Style and Rhythm Brewing Co. are two of many black-owned businesses in New Haven drawing from history and family traditions to provide delicious food and drink for local communities. Ninth-Square owner Elisha Hazel and Rhythm Brewing Co. founder Alisa Mercado share about overcoming challenges in the industry, the nuances of sustainability, and their efforts to bring people together––around the table and the pint.

about us:

website: sustainablefood.yale.edu/podcast-series
facebook: @yalesustainablefoodprogram
twitter: @ysfp
instagram: @ysfp

Chewing the Fat is a podcast from the Yale Sustainable Food Program. We cover people making change in the complex world of food and agriculture. We’re home to brilliant minds: activists, academics, chefs, entrepreneurs, farmers, journalists, policymakers, and scientists (to name a few!). Taken together, their work represents a reimagining of mainstream food movements, challenging myths and tropes as well as inspiring new ways of collaborating.

The podcast is an aural accompaniment to our on-campus Chewing the Fat speaker series, aiming to broaden our content beyond New Haven. Episodes are released every two weeks, featuring interviews, storytelling and more.

On the farm, in the classroom, and around the world, the Yale Sustainable Food Program (YSFP) grows food-literate leaders. We create opportunities for students to experience food, agriculture, and sustainability as integral parts of their education and everyday lives. For more information, please visit sustainablefood.yale.edu.


4. Young, Black, and Sustainable: Jarami Bond tells us why carpet is a hidden secret of environmental solutions



Featured as a 2017 GreenBiz 30 Under 30 emerging leader in sustainable business, Jarami Bond develops strategy, crafts communications, and leverages the power of storytelling to help mission-driven brands unlock business growth opportunities, build brand awareness, cultivate healthy company culture, and maximize positive impact. In his free time, he uses his voice, keyboard, and cameras to tell meaningful stories and better the lives of others.

Currently, Jarami serves as A&D Market Manager at Teknion.
From 2015-2019, Jarami served as the Sustainability Strategy Manager at Interface Americas, a globally-recognized sustainability leader and the world’s largest manufacturer of commercial carpet tile.

Jarami supported the advancement of Interface’s mission through strategic customer engagement and business development. He spoke at customer-facing events and conferences, sharing Interface’s sustainability story to differentiate and inspire. Jarami also worked
with Marketing and Global Communications to develop sales tools and facilitate technical trainings that equipped account executives to leverage Interface’s sustainability progress to stimulate marketplace advantage.

Jarami also created pathways for employees to connect deeply to company vision and values and make positive impacts by curating internal communications, developing employee engagement programs, and supporting diversity and inclusion strategy.

Jarami is a graduate of North Carolina State University with a B.S. in Environmental Science with a focus on Sustainable Materials and Technology. While at NC State, he scored three engineering internships with the NC Department of Transportation and a sustainability
internship with the City of Raleigh Office of Sustainability.


Clocks and Cycles Episode 2



In the second episode for YJBM’s Clocks and Cycles Issue, Huaqi and Wei interview Xiaoyong Yang, an expert on the interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism. For more information about YJBM or to read the Clocks and Cycles issue, visit medicine.yale.edu/yjbm


3. A Leader of Forestry: Sam Cook talks about his non-traditional path to success in forestry



Sam Cook is the Executive Director of Forest Asset for the NC State College of Natural Resources and VP for the Natural Resources Foundation Board. He is the former Director of Forestry for the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation in the Lowcountry (Charleston) of South Carolina and has maintained a Consulting Forestry business since 2007 in North and South Carolina. Prior to this work, Sam served in several managerial positions for International Paper Company’s Forest Resources Division for over 15 years. He has worked for Duke Energy in Durham, NC for nine years and started his forestry career with the USDA Forest Service Intermountain Forest and Range Experimental Station in Boise, ID. Sam completed an A.S. in Forestry from Tuskegee University in 1981 and a B.S. in Forest Management from NC State University in 1984.