Monthly Archives: November 2020

Developing Skills in a Virtual Space



Another consequence of the global pandemic includes the ways by which we develop professional skills. While internships in their traditional sense still occur, these may not be as readily available to individuals for a number of reasons. Additionally, working from home and/or taking courses online has altered the ways in which students and non-students work, develop skills, and move their professional identities forward. In this episode, we talk about constructive ways you can move forward in seeking out professional experiences in a virtual space.


Virtual Networking in a Pandemic



The global pandemic has interrupted many aspects of our daily lives, and that can include aspects of your career development and preparation. Networking under ‘normal’ circumstances is often seen as troublesome enough. In this new, primarily virtual, landscape, we need to adjust our methods, but we can still push forward in developing connections, learning about career paths/industries/employers, and using that information as we prepare for applying to positions in the future.


Veterans Day: Pursuing Excellence in the Military and at Yale



Yale has a proud tradition of involvement in, and ties to, military service. Through programs including the Warrior-Scholar Project, the Yale Veterans Network, and the Yale Veterans Association, the university warmly embraces its veterans, as well as those who are actively serving in the military and those who participate in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. For this Veterans Day podcast, President Salovey talks with three undergraduates in the Eli Whitney Students Program—James Hatch ’23, Andrew Nguyen ’22, and Allegra Pankratz ’21—about serving their country and finding community at Yale.


Ep. 37 – Monica Gagliano on plant intelligence and human imagination



Are plants intelligent? Can they think? Can they hear, see, feel, smell and taste? Throughout history, most Western philosophers and scientists answered those questions with a resounding “no.” Plants have long been treated as passive, inanimate objects that form the backdrop to our active lives, rather than highly sensitive organisms with intelligence and agency of their own. But on the cutting edge of modern science, this orthodoxy is being questioned by a group of daring and imaginative scientists — including our guest, Monica Gagliano — who think that plants are radically more sophisticated and sensitive than we’ve been giving them credit for. Gagliano pioneered the field of “plant bioacoustics,” the study of sounds produced by and affecting plants. The results of her groundbreaking experiments suggest that plants may perceive, solve problems, remember, and learn via mechanisms that differ from our own. In this episode, we speak with Gagliano about the profound implications of her discoveries and how listening to plants changed her understanding of the world.


Skin Episode 1: Non-Human Skin



How do animals use their skin? Why can their skin be so weird? And why can lizards regrow their tails? Learn the answers to these questions and more in this episode of the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Podcast, where hosts Elizabeth Nand, Kelsie Cassell, Carrie Ann Davison, and Devon Wasche discuss the skin of non-human animals. This episode of the YJBM Podcast is part of our series related to the March 2020 YJBM issue on skin. Visit medicine.yale.edu/yjbm for more information on YJBM and the YJBM Podcast.


Engaging Communities Through Art with Hannah Jacobson Blumenfeld



Hannah Jacobson Blumenfeld, a consultant for a variety of creative and community-based organizations, including Creative Forces: National Endowment for the Arts Military Healing Arts Network, Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, and Serve Your City, discusses how art can be used to create public good and build community partnership.