Tag Archives: climate

6. Carbon Pricing Hits a Brick Wall on the Left



In the final episode of Season 1, Casey, Naomi, and Jacob talk about the future of progressive climate policy. They speak with Michael Méndez (Assistant Professor at UC-Irvine, author of Climate Change from the Streets), Danny Cullenward (energy economist and lawyer at Stanford, author of Making Climate Policy Work), Keya Chatterjee (Executive Director of US Climate Action Network), and David Roberts (author of the Volts Newsletter), to understand what kind of climate policy progressives favor. Read more at pricingnature.substack.com.


5. The Conservative Case for Carbon Pricing



In today’s episode, Casey, Maria, and Naomi talk to conservative climate activists about why they support carbon pricing policy. We’ll hear from former Congressman Bob Inglis (RepublicEN.org), Kiera O’Brien (Young Conservatives for Carbon Dividends), former Congressman Carlos Curbelo, and Jerry Taylor (Niskanen Center). Read more at pricingnature.substack.com


4. Why doesn’t the US have a national price on carbon?



Jacob, Naomi, and Casey explore the obstacles a national carbon price has faced in the United States, and the argument for a different approach to climate action. They talk with Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Nat Keohane (Senior Vice President for Climate at EDF), Saya Ameli Hajebi (Sunrise Movement activist), Carlos Curbelo (Former Congressman R-FL 26), David Roberts (Author of Volts newsletter on clean energy and politics), and Susanne Brooks (Senior Director of U.S. Climate Policy at EDF).

Read more at pricingnature.substack.com.


3. The Road to Paris: 30 Years of Climate Negotiations in Under an Hour



In Episode 3 of Pricing Nature, Jacob, Maria, and Casey chat with Sue Biniaz (Senior Fellow for Climate Change at the UN Foundation, and Visiting Lecturer at Yale), Dan Esty (Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy at Yale), and David Roberts (Author of “Volts,” a newsletter on clean energy and politics, and formerly a journalist with Vox). Today’s episode tells the story of global climate negotiations, and how these important agreements have evolved over the last 30 years. Read more at pricingnature.substack.com.


2. What’s the Right Price for Carbon Emissions?



In today’s episode, Naomi and Casey speak with Nobel laureate William Nordhaus (a Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale), Fran Moore (an Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at UC Davis), Howard Shelanski (a Law Professor at Georgetown University and former White House administrator), and Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (US Senator from RI). They seek to understand the theory behind the “social cost of carbon”: the economic backbone of all carbon pricing schemes.

Read more at pricingnature.substack.com.


1. Intro to Carbon Pricing



Welcome to Pricing Nature, a new podcast from The Yale Center for Business and the Environment, and the Yale Carbon Charge. In this first episode, we break down the basics of pricing carbon dioxide, and other harmful greenhouse gases. We’re joined by Susanne Brooks, Senior Director of U.S. Climate Policy & Analysis at EDF, to talk about how to design good carbon pricing policies.

Read more at pricingnature.substack.com.


0. Welcome to Pricing Nature



Welcome to Pricing Nature, a limited-series podcast from the Center for Business and the Environment at Yale and the Yale Carbon Charge. We’ll tell a story about the economics, politics, and history of carbon pricing, which many argue should play a critical role in any national climate policy. Join us to hear from experts about the ins and outs of carbon pricing policy.


Introducing the Yale Environmental Dialogue Podcast



In this trailer, Dan Esty, Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy at Yale, introduces the Yale Environmental Dialogue, a new podcast from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies that will explore solutions to a sustainable future. In each episode, leading environmental thinkers from a range of disciplines, sectors, and political perspectives will share their ideas for addressing critical environmental challenges, and lead a discussion on these issues with colleagues and other experts on the likelihood of these ideas and innovations achieving meaningful change.


Ep. 14 – David Wolfson on pioneering the field of farm animal law



In the United States today, 10 billion land animals are raised and killed for food annually. That’s over 19,000 animals per minute. About 1.1 million animals during the length of this podcast. Yet as far as federal law is concerned, farmed animals do not exist. They are not counted as “animals” under the country’s primary federal animal protection law, the Animal Welfare Act. Their status is finally changing at the state level, thanks to the remarkable work of our guest, corporate lawyer and activist David Wolfson and his colleagues. We speak with David about nonhuman personhood, about the importance of teaching in driving long-term social change, and about how he’s worked to make animals legible to the law.


Ep. 10 – Dale Jamieson on love and meaning in the age of humans



In their book, Love in the Anthropocene, our guest, the environmental philosopher Dale Jamieson, and his co-author Bonnie Nadzam invite us to imagine a not-too-distant-future in which our technologies have continued to transform the face of the planet. In this world, the “sixth extinction” is long underway. Like the cities of today, rivers, lakes, forests, oceans, and fields are curated and managed by humans. Other animals remain only insofar as their existence contributes to human enjoyment. Most of them are bioengineered. We speak with Jamieson about the spiritual costs of this “narcissist’s playground,” and what we can do to preempt it.